Tips we give our Second Creative Videographers


I am David from 20.media and I have trained many videographers over the years and I wanna to share with you some of the most important tips I give someone who works with us on a shoot.

Today I will share probably the most valuable piece of advice for students coming into the live events filming environment. That is to slow your capturing brain down and count every single shot.

Some people call this the 10 second rule and I think every shot being at least 10 seconds is a great starting point.

wedding videographer rule

Why count when filming?

There is allot of things all happening at once and the temptation is to just wave your camera around and capture everything. The issue is you look back at your footage and there is nothing there you can use in the edit. You need to take a logical approach to capturing everything slowly, tell that story and then move on to capturing the next thing happening.

Personally I like to capture several different shots of the same thing so I go for a 6 second rule,
Everything I'm filming, the bridal details 6 seconds of wide then 6 seconds of tight. Venue setting shots 6 seconds movement shot, then 6 seconds static shot. Throughout the day when allot is happening I encourage you to slow down and make sure every shot you are capturing is at least 6 seconds of useable footage.


This works for more than just wedding filming

Film highlights for a conference, or live dance show as a b-roll cameraman? Use the counting rule for all your shoots to improve your skills as a camera operator and make the editors life a dream instead of a nightmare!

Another bonus rule for second operators

Our second operators are employed for their creativity and high level of skill when it comes to movement work( drones, gimbals etc). However we give them a 2 non movement rule for every 1 movement shot. This means they have to capture twice the amount of low movement as they can creative movement shots. We encourage our operators to let the natural movement take priority and let the action happen in front of the camera, instead of always creating artificial movement.

We encourage our operators to be creative in other ways, for example on how they frame their shots and angles and lenses that they use etc. (crush backgrounds)